Humane Issues in the News

Each week we post links to news about humane education & humane living, and items connected to humane issues, from human rights to environmental preservation, to animal protection, to media, consumerism and culture.


Researchers report pythons annihilating mammals & others in Everglades (via Christian Science Monitor) (1/30/12)

"Hidden risk: mercury pollution's costs to wildlife and people" (via Grist) (1/29/12)

"Inside Apple's hidden factories. Finally." (via Mother Jones) (1/27/12)

"FDA seizes nearly 14% of imported orange juice over fungicide" (via LA Times) (1/27/12)

Rattlesnake round-up becomes wildlife festival (via WTOC) (1/24/12)

Candidates in MA senate race pledge to curb third-party attacks (via Huffington Post) (1/23/12)

"Third monkey death at Harvard triggers federal probe" (via Bloomberg) (1/23/12)

"A boost to world's poorest schools" (commentary) (via NY Times) (1/19/12)

Legislators, corporations forcing climate change skepticism into classrooms (via LA Times) (1/16/12)

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Humane Educator's Toolbox: Rethinking Short

"He told me I'm not allowed to angry. 'Cause I'm white. I'm a male. And I'm straight. But he overlooked the fact that I'm very, very SHORT!"

So begins the terrific spoken word performance by Dan Sully and Tim Stafford of "Death From Below." Watch it here: (please note: mature language)




There are a lot of forms of discrimination and harassment that are overlooked. And because boys in their tweens and teens are especially susceptible to being bullied for being smaller, this is a great topic for discussion in classrooms. We're having more discussions about racism and sexism and discrimination against people who are gay -- which is important and necessary -- but very seldom do we discuss the impact of a constant and often condoned harassment and humiliation of boys and men who are on the short and slim side.

Such an exploration can spark a discussion of other forms of "acceptable" discrimination and bias (e.g., size, age, class) as well as lead to a critical examination of the portrayals of what's "normal" and "desirable" and "cool" according media and advertising, as well as the greater societal impact of size bias, from larger salaries for taller men, to a bias for tall men in leadership positions and as prospective mates.

~ Marsha

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We Need Pro-Hero Schools Instead of Anti-Bully Schools

This post is by guest blogger, Matt Langdon. Matt is the founder of The Hero Construction Company, which helps teach kids about the heroes within them and how to help their heroic selves thrive.





Image courtesy of Eddie-S
via Creative Commons.
It is very easy to find the term anti-bully these days. Look in any school and there’s a good chance you’ll see it on the walls. Look in the news and you’ll see governments (state, local, school) using it. It’s a term that has started making me cringe. For four quite different reasons.

The first problem comes with the definition of the word bully and its extension, bullying. I could poll everyone for a definition and get a different answer from each of you. In fact, I did that at a middle school last year. I gave students three minutes to write down everything they thought was covered by the term bullying. They came up with 89 different, distinct answers. This is a problem, because it affects communication.

If every student in your school pledges to refrain from bullying, each of them is pledging according to their definition. This means Jim can cross his heart and vow to never bully, then turn around and go back to calling Rodney a fag for the seventeenth time that day without breaking his promise. Jim doesn’t think that’s bullying - he thinks bullying is beating someone up.

Since the term has become a buzzword, it has become a lazy way to get attention or to describe a negative action. It is not an exaggeration to say school administrators are having to explain that giving someone a nasty look is not bullying. Calling someone a name is not bullying, but calling them a name every day for three months is. As one assistant principal said to me recently, there is a difference between being a jerk and being a bully. With the broadening of the definition of bullying, the idea of zero-tolerance towards bullying is farcical at best.

The final definition problem is that kids simply don’t use the term when they speak to each other. When it’s just a word adults use, it has a large credibility problem.

We can work to fix many aspects of this problem by being more specific when describing undesirable behaviours. Instead of saying bullying, say fighting, teasing, name-calling, humiliating. You’ll notice a difference.

The second problem with creating anti-bullying schools is that most adults don’t understand the problem. The 1980s were a golden age for high school movies. One of the features of those movies, apart from Molly Ringwald, was the bully character. We had Biff in Back to the Future, Daniel’s foes in the Karate Kid, the bad guys in Revenge of the Nerds, and James Spader in basically everything. These movies presented us with a big bad bully - someone who picked on the little, unpopular kids. That image has stuck with us, as a society.

The problem with that image is that it’s not real. I know, you’re shocked that something in a Hollywood movie isn’t real. Last year a study that was publicized in the New York Times showed that most of the bullying is happening between kids who are close to each other in the ever-changing pecking order. They are mean and aggressive in order to propel themselves up the ladder of cool.  Name-calling, rumours, exclusion, humiliation, and old-fashioned violence are tools used to advance one’s status at the expense of another. This is why so many kids hate their best friends.

The silver lining of that study showed that the top 2% on the cool scale were not bullying. They’d reached the pinnacle and didn’t need to fight any more. If we can harness the potential power of these kids, we could influence a student body in ways we can only dream of.

One thing missing from 80s movies was the internet. The internet plays an enormous part in the lives of our children. Understandably, it is also involved in a lot of the social jockeying. I imagine all of you think you have a pretty good idea of what cyber-bullying is; what it looks like. I also imagine you’d be shocked if you actually saw it in action. It is violent and disgusting and relentless. It is soul crushing. While we’re stuck in our 80s movies world, we also reference our own bullying experiences and say, “I know it’s tough, but you’ll get through it.” When your kid tells you you have no idea what they’re going through, you can believe them on this one. We need to realize that the potential for meanness has increased a million times since we were kids.

The third problem I see with anti-bullying measures is the power of labeling. When you call someone a bully, you are labeling them. You’re putting them in a pile with other bullies. This gets tough when kids refuse to play with bullies. When they walk the halls and see signs saying No Bullies, or No Bully Zone, they see they don’t belong. Bullies become outcasts.

When you consider that much of the behaviour that falls under bullying can come from a lack of social skills, you can see that this is a sinkhole. Those problems interacting with others are made more difficult by the label, so the behaviours that got them there come out again. And repeat.

Bully is a sticky label at school. Students remember it. Parents remember it. Teachers remember it. All of those people talk. Once that label has been stuck on your forehead, it’s tough to get it off. Students go home and are told to keep away from the bully by their parents. They’re told not to invite them to birthday parties. Teachers pass the information along to the next grade level team. “Watch out for Rachel, she’s a bully.” Imagine the fate of the kindergarten kid who is having trouble learning how to interact with others in January and is labeled a bully. That kid has to live with that, or do an amazing repair job, all the way through high school.

The final problem I see is that promoting an anti-bully policy is focusing on a negative. I’d prefer to stand for something positive than stand against something negative. I don’t think that’s an uncommon feeling. So, what’s my solution? I’m glad you asked.

I worked at a YMCA camp for twelve years. It was a great testing ground for theories on working with kids. When I was working directly with kids I was told it was a good idea to make rules the first night. These rules all tended to start with the word “don’t.” Don’t run. Don’t throw sticks. You know the drill. The problem with those sorts of rules is that they’re easy to exploit.

“Jim, remember our rule - don’t throw rocks.”
“This isn’t a rock, it’s a pebble.”
“Okay, we need to add a rule when we get back to the cabin.”

So we add some rules. Don’t throw stones, don’t throw sticks, don’t throw pebbles, don’t throw chipmunks. Every day there’s something new to not throw.

When I got into a director position, I decided to change things around. I created some new camp rules. The first was, “Leave it on the ground.” That took care of all projectiles right there. There were also:

“Love your feet” - instead of Don’t go barefoot.
“Let the wild things be wild” - instead of don’t pick up the snake, chipmunk, snapping turtle....
“Keep track of your counselor” - because they might get lost… instead of don’t leave your counselor.
“Avoid large trucks” - we were building a new dining hall.

The change in atmosphere at camp was palpable. Kids paid attention when we explained the rules because they weren’t like all of the other rules they were used to. Counselors and campers both understood the rules and why they were in place. It was easy to refer to the rules.

Focusing on the positive can also bring more people into the conversation. At one school there was a large poster with the number of office referrals on it as a motivation to reduce that number. Some kids took it as a challenge to increase the number. However, by flipping it, and showing the percentage of students who had not received a referral, hundreds of kids were recognized and appreciated.

Too often we tell kids what not to do, but forget to tell them what to do. If we build a positive environment with ample examples of positive behaviours, we can change the formula.

My thinking is that building a pro-hero school is greater than building an anti-bully school.

As definition was my first concern with bullying, I owe you a definition for the word hero. A hero is someone who takes action for the good of others despite a risk or sacrifice. That is, when a hero sees something they know to be wrong, they do something about it. There are ample opportunities for heroism in schools.

The number one reason negative behaviours happen in school is that the student body allows it. The default response when one sees something happening that is wrong is to do nothing - to be a bystander. The opposite of a hero is not a villain, it’s a bystander. The goal of my work and others like me is to turn bystanders into heroes.

With a school of heroes administrators won’t have to worry about eliminating problems one by one with tailor made programs that focus on the negative. A school with a large population of heroes won’t have bullying. It won’t have vandalism. It won’t have drug issues. It will have learning. It will have long-lasting relationships. It will have smiles.


Disclaimer: The opinions expressed by guest posters are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Institute for Humane Education or its staff.

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The Depth of Animal Emotions

Image copyright Zoe Weil.
For my blog post today, I’m sharing a recent post I wrote for Care2.com, an online community for people passionate about creating a better world. Here’s an excerpt from "The Depth of Animal Emotions":
"On January 14, we adopted a new dog. He was found tied to a tree a week earlier and brought to the veterinary clinic where my husband works. There he waited for his family to retrieve him. No one came, which meant, at week’s end, he needed a new home. About a year old, dirty, thin and matted, Henry Hershel (as we’re calling him) joined our crew of two dogs and a cat. He wasted no time in endearing himself to us and seemed very happy to join our family.

A week after we adopted him, we went out for a couple of hours, leaving all the dogs at home, and my husband set up his computer to videotape our living room in our absence. ...Nothing would indicate that Henry Hershel had been at all upset by our absence. But then we watched the video. Henry Hershel cried plaintively when we were gone, settling down for a while only to howl after 30 minutes, 45 minutes, 60 minutes, and so on.
...It’s amazing to me that there are people who believe that animals don’t feel. Henry Hershel shows every sign of feeling as deeply, if not more deeply, than humans. Whether what he was feeling during our absence was sorrow, fear, loneliness, yearning, anxiety, longing, worry, loss, or some combination of these or other emotions, I cannot be sure, but he is certainly feeling something. His utter delight upon our return offers a glimpse into his other, more positive feelings. Like us, his spectrum of emotions is wide."

For a humane world,

Zoe Weil, President, Institute for Humane Education
Author of Most Good, Least Harm, Above All, Be Kind, and The Power and Promise of Humane Education
My TEDx talk: “The World Becomes What You Teach"

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The Power of Humane Education

Image courtesy of soot+chalk via Creative Commons.
For my blog post today, I’m sharing a recent post I wrote for Care2.com, an online community for people passionate about creating a better world. Here’s an excerpt from "The Power of Humane Education":
"It really doesn’t take much to ignite a passion for good among youth and adults alike. A week of [teaching humane education] classes turned an eighth grade that, on Monday, did not feel particularly moved to action or responsible for helping to create a more just and humane world, into a deeply caring group that eagerly embraced a project to make a difference by Friday. I witnessed this transformation as each day brought out even more of the compassion and kindness they had identified on day one as qualities that were most important to them.

"What is harder than sparking concern, care, and commitment is sustaining and nurturing this energy; providing the breadth and depth of accurate information about entrenched and pervasive challenges; and teaching them critical and creative thinking skills so that they remain the bedrock of each individual’s approach to healthy, positive, wise changemaking for all.

"The issues that humane education addresses are complex, covering human rights, animal protection and environmental preservation. The solutions to the interconnected – and sometimes conflicting – problems in the world aren’t easy to determine or implement. A week-long humane education course may seem life-changing, but for many that change may fade unless it is fostered and nourished."
Read the complete post.


For a humane world,

Zoe Weil, President, Institute for Humane Education
Author of Most Good, Least Harm, Above All, Be Kind, and The Power and Promise of Humane Education
My TEDx talk: “The World Becomes What You Teach"

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FREE Professional Development for "Green" Educators: Environmental Education Webinars from Green Teacher Magazine

If you're a "green" teacher looking for environmental education ideas and resources to integrate into your classroom and school community, be sure to check out Green Teacher's free series of webinars. The webinars are each an hour long and are part presentation, part Q and A on a variety of environmental topics. Some of the topics for winter/spring 2012 include:

  • using nature journals;
  • engaging culturally diverse audiences;
  • creating forest kindergartens;
  • exploring place-based education;
  • teaching about climate change.


Past webinars are available to everyone for a month after the class, and to Green Teacher subscribers for an unlimited time.

Find out more.

~ Marsha

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Grants for Graduate Students Passionate About Animals

Helping animals just because we want to is awesome, and being able to help animals AND getting funding to do so is a bonus! Current graduate students who are passionate about helping animals can apply for an Animal Welfare Trust internship grant, which will help fund either an independent student research project, or an internship (that would otherwise be unpaid) with an established animal protection organization. Grants are generally around $5,000.

To apply, students:
  • Must be a graduate student at the time of the application and for the duration of the proposed internship;
  • Must have a demonstrated interest in animal welfare; 
  • Internship funding must be for an independent project approved by and under the supervision of a university professor or for an unpaid position within an established organization; 
  • Internships can be for a summer, semester or year-long duration.

The Animal Welfare Trust is devoted to helping all animals, but they're especially interested in projects focused on humane education, farmed animal issues, and/or pro-vegetarian campaigns.

The deadline to apply is March 1, 2012.

Find out more.

~ Marsha

(h/t to Our Hen House)

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Why We Need Humane Education: Books & Mexican American Studies Banned in AZ

Image courtesy of Rethinking Schools.
In 2010 Arizona passed a law that "authorizes the state superintendent to stop any ethnic studies classes that promote the overthrow of the U.S. government, promote resentment toward a race or class of people, are designed primarily for pupils of a particular ethnic group or advocate ethnic solidarity instead of the treatment of pupils as individuals." In the last couple of weeks, there has been a lot of fall out from the Tucson school district's decision to suspend its Mexican American Studies (MAS) program in order to avoid being financially penalized. As part of the program's suspension, the district has also decided to "confiscate" seven books from the curriculum and to ask that the other nearly 50 titles used in the MAS program be removed from classrooms. To find out more, here are a few essays & blog posts worth reading:

"Rethinking Columbus Banned in Tucson" by Bill Bigelow of Rethinking Schools

"Mexican American Studies Department Reading List" by Debbie Reese of American Indians in Children's Literature

"Breaking 'the Madness' of the Tucson Book Ban: Interview with Mexican American Studies Teacher Curtis Acosta on The Tempest" by Jeff Biggers of Huffington Post

"Mexican American Studies: Ban Ban or Bad Class" NPR interview with AZ school superintendent John Huppenthal


One of the purported goals of the law (and of the suspension of the MAS program) is to prevent courses that "promote resentment toward a race or class of people," but given that all instruction and curriculum has some bias, how is it possible to completely avoid teaching something that might not "promote resentment toward a race or class of people"? As NPR interviewer Michel Martin asks:
"... if the provision of the law is that a class can't promote resentment, how would you measure that? I mean, couldn't pretty much anything promote resentment, even if historically true? Like, for example, I mean the Holocaust. You mentioned Mein Kampf. I mean, couldn't you presumably learn about the Holocaust and feel resentment if you were a person of a number of backgrounds? If you were a person of Jewish background? If you were a person of - if you were gay or a lesbian, if you were a disabled person, wouldn't that - I'm just wondering how you can teach something in a manner where you are going to guarantee what a student may or may not feel."

And, from a CNN report: "A witness for the school system argued that teaching students 'historical facts of oppression and racism' was less likely to promote 'racial resentment' -- something specifically banned by the 2010 law -- than ignoring that history."

What's happening in Arizona is a great opportunity for discussion in classrooms, but it's also another example of why humane education is so important. If students aren't taught to think critically and deeply about issues, and to consider broader perspectives, different viewpoints, and their own and others' biases, then they're more likely grow up tied to a narrower, stricter worldview that fears differing perspectives and thoughtful discussion and exploration about difficult issues, and to react to that fear in ways that may harm others.

~ Marsha

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A Prison Without Bars Reminds Us We Can Change Entrenched Systems

Image courtesy of randy OHC via Creative Commons.
For my blog post today, I’m sharing a recent post I wrote for Care2.com, an online community for people passionate about creating a better world. Here’s an excerpt from "A Prison Without Bars Reminds Us We Can Change Entrenched Systems":
"I recently learned about the Bastoy prison in Norway, where 115 prisoners, some of whom are murderers and rapists, live without bars or barbed wire. Set on a one square mile island, the inmates live relatively free lives. While they are not permitted to leave the island and must appear for a head count four times a day, little could stop them if they chose to walk across the frozen ice in the winter, or swim in the summer, to the mainland just two miles away. But in the 20 years this “alternative” prison has existed, they haven’t had anyone leave. Prisoners must apply to Bastoy to live a different sort of prison life, one in which they work (and are paid), are part of a community, grow food, compost, build, cook, do their laundry and live a relatively normal village life. In the evenings, only five guards remain on the island....

"As someone who promotes solutions to complex challenges and solutionary education, I find Norway’s approach intriguing and compelling. If the goal is to provide the most effective, practical, efficient and fiscally wise approach to tackle the thorny problem of criminals and imprisonment, Norway seems to have come up with a positive solution that is cost-effective, positive, successful and humane.
"

Read the complete essay.


For a humane world,

Zoe Weil, President, Institute for Humane Education
Author of Most Good, Least Harm, Above All, Be Kind, and The Power and Promise of Humane Education
My TEDx talk: “The World Becomes What You Teach"

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Humane Issues in the News

Each week we post links to news about humane education & humane living, and items connected to humane issues, from human rights to environmental preservation, to animal protection, to media, consumerism and culture.


Change.org emerges as influential tool for social change (via Washington Post) (1/24/12)

Sumatran elephants critically endangered (via The Guardian) (1/24/12)

"Supreme Court rejects California anti-animal cruelty law on pigs" (via LA Times) (1/23/12)

Why Apple products aren't made in the U.S. (via NY Times) (1/22/12)

Child slavery and chocolate (via CNN) (1/19/12)

Peter Singer: Dolphins shouldn't be enslaved by U.S. Navy against Iran (commentary) (via The Guardian) (1/19/12)

Obama puts Keystone XL pipeline on hold for now (via NY Times) (1/18/12)

"Education advocates enter the climate tempest" (via Science) (1/17/12)

U.S. to ban import of 4 species of snakes (via Miami-Herald) (1/17/12)


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5 Strategies to Help Bring Humane Education to Schools

With the pressures of standardized testing, common standards, overflowing classrooms and overworked teachers, integrating humane education into the classroom may seem an overwhelming task, especially if you feel resistance from fellow educators and school administrators. But humane education can easily be integrated into most any subject or curriculum. Whether you're a classroom teacher or community educator, there are numerous strategies you can use to help ease the way for bringing humane education into schools. Here are 5.

  1. STANDARDS:
    The easiest and most obvious way is to link humane education content to standards. With 45 states having adopted the new "common core standards" they serve as a useful means for integrating humane education into what you're already teaching. Even with strict requirements, educators can integrate humane principles and issues into their work. Teacher Alison Panik, who took our Teaching for a Positive Future online course, started integrating reverence for nature with her required math and science studies. IHE M.Ed. graduate, Christopher Greenslate, wrote an article highlighting how he integrated humane education into his teaching of language arts, including required books like Lord of the Flies. And IHE M.Ed. graduate, Kurt Schmidt has easily found creative ways to integrate humane studies into how he teaches math. If you're a community educator who wants to offer humane education presentations in schools, it's important to familiarize yourself with standards and highlight the strong connections between them and your content.

  2. LAWS:
    Many educators may not know it, but in several states, it's actually the law to include some form of humane education in their teaching (especially for younger students). Laws vary, but several states have some sort of legislation that requires teaching about the welfare of animals, character education, and/or environmental education. HEART keeps an updated list of laws related to humane education.

    And, last June, Maryland became the first state to require "environmental literacy" for graduation. Other states have varying requirements for environmental studies. Introducing humane education studies to your school(s) can help the district meet legal requirements.

  3. BY ANY OTHER NAME:
    While we at IHE like to call what we do humane education, what label we use is not as important as the emphasis on the interconnectedness of human rights, animal protection, and environmental preservation and on nurturing solutionaries. Some educators call it global studies; some say social justice; some just call it education. If there's something happening in your district that aligns with humane education principles and content, plug yourself into that. There are also other programs, growing in popularity in schools, that overlap with some of the elements of humane education. Such programs offer an excellent segue for introducing humane education issues and principles. Here are 3 examples:

    Character Education

    While fewer than half of states either mandate or encourage character education, many districts encourage teaching positive character traits. While character education itself follows a much narrower definition and vision, teaching about values such as responsibility, caring, and respect easily translates to exploring our impact on people, animals & the earth, and what we can do, both individually and systemically, to create a more just, compassionate world for all.

    Social Emotional Learning

    According to the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning, Social & Emotional Learning, SEL, "teaches the skills we all need to handle ourselves, our relationships, and our work, effectively and ethically." Many schools are beginning to integrate some form of SEL into their curriculum, which provides a great connection to humane education.

    Service Learning

    Service Learning is another concept that's sweeping classrooms around the world. It varies in scope, but its core focus is bringing what students are learning in the classroom into the real world to address real-life issues and to help students become responsible citizens. Humane education is all about solving real-life problems, so service learning provides a terrific opportunity.


  4. CREATIVE OPPORTUNITIES:
    If you want to start small, taking advantage of special school opportunities is a great strategy. If you're a classroom teacher, look for special school-wide events, like celebrations of Earth Day, World Water Week, No Name-Calling Week, or Be Kind to Animals Week to integrate humane education lessons. You may even be able to recruit your colleagues to tweak their own lessons. If you're a community educator, you can find special events as a means to plug in to schools; but also look for career days, speaker series, and other special events to offer yourself as an expert or resource.

  5. START WITH ONE:
    If you're a community educator wanting to get into schools, start by connecting with a friendly teacher who's doing humane education-related work in the classroom or community. Find out what s/he's teaching and customize accordingly. Offer to demonstrate a sample lesson and, if needed, to talk to the school administrator (districts vary as to how much control teachers have over issues like guest speakers). Once you've built one successful relationship, you can branch off from there. Word of mouth is very effective. If you're a classroom teacher, look for one other educator and invite them to collaborate with you on a small project or lesson that embodies humane education. Start with that small success and keep going.
 ~ Marsha

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8 Tips for Sharing Accurate Information

Image courtesy of xtrarant via Creative Commons.
One of our essential duties as a humane educator or advocate for our cause is to ensure to the best of our ability that the information we’re sharing is accurate. The first of the 4 elements of humane education is to "provide accurate information." Whether we're giving a presentation to an audience of hundreds, writing a letter to the editor, or even having a conversation with a single person, truthful, credible, accurate information is paramount. Here are 8 tips to consider about providing accurate information:

  1. Use reliable sources and double check them. Don’t just take one organization’s/resource's word for it; check several sources. If you’re seeing facts and statistics on a website, do they cite those sources? Are those sources credible, or are they links to more sites and information of the same type (e.g., advocacy sites linking to more advocacy sites)? What’s the original source of that information? One of the assignments when I was a student in IHE's program was to choose a fact or statistic from one of our required texts, and to do my own research to verify the accuracy of the claim. I discovered that my chosen statistic, although honestly intended to be accurate, was actually quite misleading.
  2. Whenever possible use primary sources. Can you visit a factory farm yourself? Read that latest study on global warming and not just skim the press release? Talk to a person who’s an expert on the issue in question? Find the original source for the statistic being used? Go to the credible source when you can.
  3. Use industry and government sources when possible and appropriate. No, they’re not necessarily more likely to be accurate or credible; but, like it or not, the public often gives more credence to industry and government sources as being “objective” and tends to think that advocacy groups are more “biased.” One of the things I love about Vegan Outreach’s literature is that they often use farmed animal industry statistics and quotes to show just how cruel and destructive industry practices are.
  4. Be able to cite your sources. People may want to follow up on what you've told them, so be sure that you can point them to the sources from which you've gleaned your information. I was once yelled at by a mother who was afraid I was trying to indoctrinate her child, until I politely and calmly showed her the sources for the information I had shared. She thanked me for being so thorough and accommodating.
  5. Never exaggerate or mislead. It may sometimes be tempting to generalize or exaggerate just a tiny bit, since it’s for a good cause, but honesty and accuracy must prevail. Often people are already skeptical of the kinds of information that humane educators and activists share, so if you get caught telling a little white lie, your credibility vanishes, and a potential future advocate is lost.
  6. It’s okay to say “I don’t know.” There are so many challenges in the world, that even if you focus on one issue, there’s too much to know. Certainly it’s important to be as knowledgeable as you can, so be sure to continue to educate yourself; but, it’s okay to tell someone that you don’t know the answer to their question or assertion. People will usually appreciate your honesty, and if you can point them to some credible resources that CAN answer their question, even better.
  7. Tell them “Don’t take my word for it.” Invite your audience to explore the issue(s) themselves and do their own investigating. They’re more likely to believe what they read, see or hear with their own senses, rather than getting it second (or third) hand. We WANT to encourage critical thinking and questioning, including of what we ourselves are saying.
  8. Admit when you’re wrong. Information is dynamic, and with new knowledge, facts and statistics can change. New studies may reveal new data. Or, you may have found the same statistic from three reliable sources and then subsequently discovered that all of them were mistaken. Don’t hesitate to admit if you’ve been inadvertently sharing an inaccurate piece of information or if someone you’re talking to turns out to know more about the issue than you do. Mistakes happen. Honesty and sincerity are more important than clinging to erroneous data, even if it seems to “weaken” your stance.
And, of course, it’s important to remember that not everyone responds to logic and data. Many changes of heart (and habits) aren’t made from the information on charts and graphs, but come from an awareness of the impact of our choices on others and a realization that we have the power to stop causing others harm.

~ Marsha


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3 Tips for Helping Raise Kids to Serve

Image courtesy of Alameda County Community Food Bank
via Creative Commons.
For my blog post today, I’m sharing a recent post I wrote for One Green Planet, a website dedicated to ethical choices. Here’s an excerpt from "3 Tips for Helping Raise Kids to Serve":
"It is always unnerving to me when I meet middle and upper middle class teenagers who don’t feel a sense of responsibility or a desire to improve the world, help the poor, protect the vulnerable (whether human or nonhuman), make humane choices, or be of service to others. Our culture today seems to foster a sense of entitlement that I find damaging not only to our world, but to our children whose lives are diminished by a focus too intent upon the self.

So how does one foster a service ethic and sense of responsibility toward others among children? Waiting until the teen years is often too late. Service should begin very early on."
Read the complete post.


For a humane world,

Zoe Weil, President, Institute for Humane Education
Author of Most Good, Least Harm, Above All, Be Kind, and The Power and Promise of Humane Education
My TEDx talk: “The World Becomes What You Teach"

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Contests for Youth Peacemakers & Environmentalists

We recently learned about a couple of cool contests for youth changemakers:


What About Peace Youth Arts Contest

Sponsored by Global Exchange, What About Peace is an international arts contest for youth, ages 14-20, to express their ideas about peace by responding artistically to the question "What about peace?" Participants can enter something either written (a story, essay, poem) or visual (photo, painting, drawing, etc.) to answer the question.

The grand prize is $1,000.

Submissions are due by February 15, 2012.

Find out more.



Silent Spring Essay Competition

Fifty years ago scientist Rachel Carson rocked the world with the findings she published in her classic book, Silent Spring.  In commemoration, the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society is seeking essays from students "which analyze the impact and reception of Silent Spring as well as the legacy of Rachel Carson."  According to the website, essay topics might include:
  • How has Silent Spring shaped environmentalism or environmental thought in various countries? How is it a global phenomenon?
  • What elements of Silent Spring have had the greatest impact on environmental leaders? Policy makers?
  • How is Silent Spring still relevant to current environmental debates?
  • If Rachel Carson were alive today, what would she be writing about?
The RCC will be awarding a prize for the most outstanding essays:

The Junior Prize: $1,000 for 1,000 words (or less) is open to students ages 13-18. (There's also a senior category for ages 19 and older.)

Submissions are due via email by March 15, 2012.

Find out more.

~ Marsha

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An Eighth-Grader's Letter to Apple's CEO, Tim Cook

Image courtesy of ralphunden via Creative Commons.
For my blog post today, I’m sharing a recent post I wrote for Care2.com, an online community for people passionate about creating a better world. Here’s an excerpt from "An Eighth-Grader's Letter to Apple's CEO, Tim Cook":

This past week, I taught a humane education course to an eighth grade class in Blue Hill, Maine. The course focused on changemakers, people who work to transform unjust and inhumane systems into ones that are healthy, peaceful and compassionate.

On the first day of class, I had the students listen to an episode of This American Life, which aired an excerpt from Mike Daisey’s one-man show about the production of Apple products. Then I gave them a homework assignment to write to Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO, to share their thoughts, feelings and ideas. I wanted these students to have the opportunity to use their voice to help change this unjust and inhumane system, since they couldn’t use the power of their wallets to simply choose more humane electronics.

Below is just one of their letters. I hope it will inspire you to also use your voice to create change.

Read the complete post.

For a humane world,

Zoe Weil, President, Institute for Humane Education
Author of Most Good, Least Harm, Above All, Be Kind, and The Power and Promise of Humane Education
My TEDx talk: “The World Becomes What You Teach"

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Resources for Teaching About Human Trafficking

On January 11, high school teacher Shelley Wright's students each wore a barcode to school. Their goal? To "represent that people should not be bought and sold, to start conversations with those around them that slavery still exists, and as a visual symbol that our work is not done." January 11 is National Human Trafficking Awareness Day, and recently President Obama declared January as National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month. Modern day slavery continues to flourish, including in the U.S., and human trafficking is a topic both relevant and interesting to students. Many aren't aware that it exists. Social studies teacher, Elizabeth Devine, spends three weeks of her semester-long human rights course exploring human trafficking.

There are numerous useful resources available for teaching about human trafficking with older students. Here are just a few selected examples.

Books:

Ending Slavery
by Kevin Bales (2007)
What can people, community and governments do to end slavery now?

Enslaved: True Stories of Modern Day Slavery
by Jesse Sage & Liora Kasten, eds. (2008)
Collection of first-hand accounts of modern slavery around the world.

The Slave Next Door: Human Trafficking & Slavery in America Today
by Kevin Bales & Ron Soodalter (2009)
Documents cases of modern slavery in the U.S., discusses causes, and offers solutions.

Not for Sale: The Return of the Global Slave Trade -- And How We Can Fight It
by David Batstone (2007)
Reveals accounts of victims of slavery and what people can do.

Free the Children
by Craig Kielburger (1998)
An article in the news led a young man on a crusade that has touched millions and has freed thousands of child slaves.

Films:

Call + Response
”...goes deep undercover where slavery is thriving from the child brothels of Cambodia to the slave brick kilns of rural India."

The Day My God Died
“Entering the brothels of Bombay with hidden cameras, The Day My God Died documents the tragedy of the child sex trade, exposing human rights violations and profiling the courageous abolitionists who are working towards change.”

Free the Slaves documentaries
A useful collection of brief documentaries about human trafficking and modern slavery.

Human Trafficking
A fictionalized story of human trafficking; useful introduction for high school students.

Not for Sale: The Documentary
“Covers what modern-day abolitionists are doing to fight the rampant terrors of human trafficking in the US and abroad.” From the book of the same name.

Websites/Organizations:

Anti-Slavery International Teacher Resources
Includes curriculum and resource ideas for teaching about modern slavery.

Free the Slaves
A non-profit leading campaigns, as well as offering videos, survivor stories, and resources for teachers.

Human Trafficking
A blog featuring media and information about modern-day slavery.

Not for Sale Teacher Resources
Includes curriculum and offers other opportunities for students and teachers to get involved in learning about & stopping human slavery.

Polaris Project 
Offers an overview of human trafficking & works toward long-term solutions.

Slavery Footprint
Take the survey and find out how many slaves are working for us, based on the products we buy, foods we eat, sports we play, etc.

Slavery Map
A crowdsourced map that allows people to map documented cases of human trafficking/slavery in their communities.

The U.S. Department of State Office to Monitor & Combat Trafficking in Persons 
Includes the annual Trafficking in Persons Report, which reports on the efforts of governments worldwide to combat human trafficking.

Also check out IHE's humane education activity, Do You Want Slavery With That?, which explores modern-day slavery with middle and high schoolers.

~ Marsha

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Humane Educator's Toolbox: Parodying Society's Unrealistic Standards of Beauty

Image from "Fotoshop by Adobé"
"It's you, perfected... Finally look the way you've always dreamed." ~ from  "Fotoshop by Adobé"

We've seen the ads that portray impossible and unrealistic standards, and the exposés that highlight the alteration of images of the beautiful and thin to make them even more beautiful and thin (and often lighter in skin tone if they're women of color). Media and culture offer us false hopes and expectations and help add pressure on our young people to conform to stricter and unhealthier definitions of "beautiful" and "cool." Media messages about beauty is a great issue to explore with middle and high school students, and filmmaker Jesse Rosten offers a great springboard for discussion with his recent "Fotoshop by Adobé" parody.

Rosten's film riffs off all those beauty commercials that promise virtually instant beauty with the application of their products. As Gwen at Sociological Images says, "the video parodies beauty product commercials that play on and encourage insecurities while promising women magical transformations that will allow them to attain entirely unrealistic beauty standards overnight due to ground-breaking science-y sounding ingredients and processes ('pro-pixel intensifying fauxtanical hydro-jargon microbead extract')."

The film integrates actual examples of celebrity photos that have been altered to show just how pervasive this practice is. As the parody's narrator says, "You don't have to rely on a healthy body image or self-respect anymore."

Watch the parody (about 2 minutes):



Fotoshop by Adobé from Jesse Rosten on Vimeo.

You can pair Rosten's film with some of our activities exploring media and "coolness," such as Analyzing Advertising or The Cool Factor. Or for a broader exploration of the impact of our personal care products on people, animals, & the planet, check out What Price Beauty?

~ Marsha

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Humane Issues in the News...

Each week we post links to news about humane education & humane living, and items connected to humane issues, from human rights to environmental preservation, to animal protection, to media, consumerism and culture.


21-year-old student brings light to needy people in India (via Grist) (1/16/12)

How can we make more heroes? (via Globe and Mail) (1/16/12)

"Laying it on the line at a badger killing ground" (via Yorkshire Post) (1/16/12)

U.S. fair trade certification goes corporate (via Treehugger) (1/16/12)

Sisters sell cookies to help save endangered animals (via KSL.com) (1/16/12)

The re-rise of groups like United Students Against Sweatshops (via Alternet) (1/15/12)

State-mandated ethnic studies ban leads to banned books (via Salon.com) (1/13/12)

High schooler educates others about factory farming (via Afro.com) (1/12/12)

"Creating an anti-racist classroom" (commentary) (via Edutopia) (1/12/12)

"Fighting global injustice and poverty...with crafts: meet the Craftivists" (via Treehugger) (1/12/12)

Air Canada, trying to get out of business of shipping monkeys, meets resistance (via Yahoo!) (1/11/12)

Poultry hatchery sued for alleged animal abuse (via Santa Cruz Sentinel) (1/11/12)



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Couple Turns to Art to Aid in Dream of a No-Kill Nation

We Americans love our dogs. We treat them like family; many of us let them sleep in our beds. We even buy them holiday presents and dress them up for Halloween. And we can't seem to get enough of those cute and silly dog videos on the web. So why in the U.S. are an estimated 5,500 dogs killed each day at shelters around the country?

Mark Barone and Marina Dervan first learned about the situation for dogs in shelters when they went to adopt a dog of their own. What they discovered so shocked them that they quit their jobs and decided to create a giant art exhibit -- An Act of Dog -- to educate the public about homeless dogs and to raise money toward helping create a no-kill nation. Mark is painting portraits of dogs who have been euthanized in shelters around the U.S. -- 5,500 of them, to represent the number of dogs killed in those same shelters in a single day. Once the paintings are finished, they'll be sold. Mark and Marina hope to raise $20 million for foster, rescue, and no-kill groups.

According to Mark, who is painting all the portraits over a two-year period, they want people who see the exhibit "to have a deeply visceral, visual and vivid experience. We want the 5,500 sweet faces to move them to action. We want people to recognize that what took one man two years to paint we kill in just one day."

Read more about what Mark and Marina are doing in this recent interview on the blog Zoe.

Mark and Marina's project is a great reminder that humane education doesn't have to mean getting up in front of a group of people to speak. Art is another powerful means for educating and empowering others.

~ Marsha

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From Complaint to Compassion to Kindness

One of my favorite quotations is this: “Be kind for everyone is fighting a great battle.”

It’s often a hard one to remember when we're late and the driver ahead is poking along, or when we're treated rudely or worse, or when someone seems truly mean-spirited or cruel. Yet kindness always matters, and often our lack of kindness and empathy stems simply from our own impatience and self-involvement. Watch this beautiful video to be reminded of the power and joy that comes when we awaken to others’ pain and choose to be of service.




 For a kind world,

Zoe Weil, President, Institute for Humane Education
Author of Most Good, Least Harm, Above All, Be Kind, and The Power and Promise of Humane Education
My TEDx talk: “The World Becomes What You Teach"

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Ten OTHER Things Martin Luther King, Jr., Said

Ill Doctrine video blogger Jay Smooth shares inspiring words, from an inspiring hero:





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Why Are We Eating Less Meat?

Mark Bittman, opinion columnist at the New York Times who writes about food, begins 2012 with a piece titled, “We’re Eating Less Meat. Why?” According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, meat consumption is declining and is predicted to continue its decline. While the livestock industry blames, among other things, the federal government’s supposed “war on meat protein consumption,” which is truly bizarre given that the federal government subsidizes animal agriculture with our tax dollars and buys massive quantities of meat for the school lunch program, Bittman posits that the primary decline in meat consumption is due to a growing population of educated consumers who are choosing to reduce and often eliminate animal products from their diet for three primary reasons: their health, the environment, and concerns about animals. Read his essay here.

 For a humane world,

Zoe Weil, President, Institute for Humane Education
Author of Most Good, Least Harm, Above All, Be Kind, and The Power and Promise of Humane Education
My TEDx talk: “The World Becomes What You Teach"

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What Are Picture Books Teaching Us?: It's Okay to Treat Children With Disrespect

As a former youth and still occasional librarian, I'm familiar with many of the messages children's picture books convey to their readers. From Columbus-as-hero to cultural stereotypes to the way farmed animals' lives (and sometimes deaths) are portrayed, children's literature offers a bounty of themes and messages to critically analyze.

I came across a great example on the blog of parent Jennifer Lehr: Jennifer bought her daughter a copy of the "classic," best-selling picture book, No, David! by David Shannon and discovered a "cringe-inducing, profoundly depressing and ultimately tragic tale of a mother-son relationship."

The entire story is about David doing things that cause his mother to say "No, David!" Here's where Lehr finds fault: "Do [the author and publisher] really want to condone, let alone celebrate the punishment of children? Because the truth is, there are plenty of ways to set limits and gain children’s cooperation without admonishing, humiliating and isolating them."

She then goes on to offer a great example of a different way of "dealing with" David: Instead of telling David "No!" for writing on the walls, she offers this alternative:
“David honey, I can see how a big blank white wall looks so inviting, but walls aren’t for coloring on. Actually, let me rephrase that, our walls aren’t for coloring on .... It’s true, there are plenty of artists—some really famous like the Diego Rivera and Michelangelo —who have painted on walls, and even ceilings! Actually now that I think about it, prehistoric man was drawing on the walls of caves over 30,000 years ago! Hmm, I wonder if it’s some sort of primal impulse we all have? Anyway honey, we don’t allow drawing on the walls in our house.  But I have an idea. I’m going to buy you some big poster boards and tape them to the wall so you can make the really large drawings you love. But until you’re old enough to remember not to draw on the walls, I’m going to hang out with you when you draw. When I can’t, I’ll have to put the crayons away and you can play something else.”

She also engages her daughter in critical thinking about the images in the book:

“Let’s just start with the cover. Okay, so I see that David is knocking over the goldfish bowl. It looks to me like he really wants to see the fish but the bowl is just up too high and…”

“Yeah, ” Jules said, pointing to the picture. “See how he piled up books so he could climb up higher?”

“That was clever of him! I hadn’t even noticed. Gosh he really wanted to see those fish. How do you think he felt when his plan failed and he knocked over the table and the fishbowl by accident?”
“Sad for the fish. Maybe scared.”

“Yeah…and then to have his mom yell at him? I bet that made him feel even worse. You know, I don’t think his mother used the best judgment when she put the fishbowl on a small but tall pedestal table in the middle of the room. I mean what’s the fun in having fish if you can’t easily get a good look? Can you think of any better places they could have put it?”

Together Jules and I decided a dresser with a step stool nearby would have given David the access he needed while giving the fish the protective space they needed.
Read the complete post.

Many people see the book as cute and harmless. But Lehr digs beyond the surface story to really critically examine the way David's behavior is framed, and the messaging that so many no's present. As Lehr explains to her daughter:
“I want you to know that children aren’t born knowing what they can and can’t do and that it’s their parents job to help them learn. But it’s so important how parents do it, because if parents treat children with respect and understanding, then that’s what their kids will learn. But if parents are impatient and hurtful then that’s what their kids will learn and I don’t want you or your brother to think it’s okay to be mean to other people. It’s not. No one deserves to be treated the way David was.”

 An important reminder to be mindful and thoughtful in our daily lives.

~ Marsha

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Resisting the School-to-Prison Pipeline

"Robert was an 11-year-old in 5th grade who, in his rush to get to school on time, put on a dirty pair of pants from the laundry basket. He did not notice that his Boy Scout pocketknife was in one of the pockets until he got to school. He also did not notice that it fell out when he was running in gym class. When the teacher found it and asked whom it belonged to, Robert volunteered that it was his, only to find himself in police custody minutes later. He was arrested, suspended, and transferred to a disciplinary school." ~ Zero Tolerance in Philadelphia report

Our friends at Rethinking Schools have dedicated the latest issue of their magazine to the topic of the school-to-prison pipeline, an alarming trend of policies that, especially among youth of color, push students out of school and facilitate their entering the criminal justice system. (For one overview of the issue, check out the ACLU's "School-to-Prison Pipeline Game."

As the editors of Rethinking Schools magazine say:
"What has come to be called the “school-to-prison pipeline” is turning too many schools into pathways to incarceration rather than opportunity. This trend has extraordinary implications for teachers and education activists. It affects everything from what we teach to how we build community in our classrooms, how we deal with conflicts with and among our students, how we build coalitions, and what demands we see as central to the fight for social justice education."

 The issue includes:
  • An interview with author Michelle Alexander about the mass incarceration of people of color;
  • An exploration of "zero tolerance" policies and their role in "criminalizing" youth;
  • An essay by a teacher who reminds us of the importance of creating safe, compelling classrooms;
  • Stories from students & teachers about their experiences;
The entire issue isn't available online (it's a great magazine, so we highly recommend that educators subscribe), but you can read several of the articles and essays here.

This issue is an eye-opening reminder of just how much power our education system has to help or hurt students, of the challenges many of our children face, and of how far we have to go in combating racial oppression.

~ Marsha

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Connecting People, Animals, Planet: 6 Questions for Connectionist Ashley Maier

As with many who want to create a better world for all, one thing leads to another. Ashley Maier, who currently serves as the Prevention Program Coordinator for the Oregon Attorney General's Sexual Assault Task Force, found that her focus on working at the roots of overturning the oppression and exploitation of women led to a connection with the exploitation of nonhuman animals and the planet. Now Ashley uses her connectionist vision -- and her organization, Connect the Dots -- to address the connections between human, animal, and environmental well-being. We asked Ashley to tell us more about her work for a just, compassionate, healthy world for all.



IHE: What drew you to humane education?

AM:
Human rights work, actually. Work against violence, against women in particular. I’m one of the rare people who was drawn to expand my lens from human-exclusivity to include non-human animals and the environment due to my human rights work. I remember that I got a pamphlet from Vegan Outreach in 2005. I had been a vegetarian for a long time, but never was fully exposed to the realities of animal exploitation beyond actual consumption of animal flesh. That pamphlet drew me to veganism. Once I was vegan, and I continued to work against domestic and sexual violence, I saw the very norms, standards for behavior, that support violence against women support violence in so many new places. I realized that those same norms support the exploitation of the planet and all of its inhabitants.  I knew that I would never end gendered violence as long as the roots of generalized violence remain intact and manifest throughout our environments, systems, and behaviors. It just clicked. I started making the connections because I had to. The prevention of violence against women demanded it.


IHE: What led you to co-found Connect the Dots and to call it a "connectionist movement" and yourself a "connectionist"?

AM:
From the first day that the interconnections clicked for me, I learned that it was not safe to talk about this within my human-exclusive, social justice circles. It was too “radical,” too much to actually imply caring for animals “as much as” humans.  I could lose my job. So I started searching. I felt so very alone. I started to talk to animal rights folks about this and Kath Rogers from Animal Protection and Rescue League said she knew someone who she thought could relate. It was then that I met my partner in this work, Stacia Mesleh. She too came from the anti violence against women movement and she agreed with me! It was like breathing for the first time after holding your breath just to the point of losing consciousness. We started Connect the Dots because we felt that something major was missing from social justice work: work at the intersections, at the roots. We wanted to build a movement of folks who make the connections and who allow those connections to inform their work towards a peaceful and just world.  We wanted to break down the false dichotomies, the walls, that divide human, animal, and environmental movements. We call it a connectionist movement because that’s what it is: a movement of connectionists – folks who make connections between human, animal, and environmental well-being.  And it’s growing! 


IHE: What have been some of your biggest challenges? Your biggest successes?

AM:
Honestly, our biggest challenge has been life. Full-time jobs, moves, family …you name it. This isn’t a popular concept at which people are throwing money, as I’m sure you know, so having to do this as a “side project” while attempting to support ourselves by other means has been a big barrier. Also, I can’t tell you how many times we’ve heard that it’s “too radical.” In general, we find that animal rights folks are supportive of the concept. Human rights folks? Not so much. What we’ve learned is that the very norms that support violence against the planet and its inhabitants are alive and well in our movements. Our challenge is to work to shift these norms. So one of the biggest barriers is also one of the main foci of our work. Finally, if we were celebrities, this would be a whole lot easier. 

Successes? We’re still here! This can be incredibly discouraging and lonely work. But we’re still here. And the movement is growing.  We meet more and more people every day who consider themselves connectionists. People are studying this much more in school, incorporating it into their activism, and living their lives through a lens of interconnection. It’s exciting!  And most exciting of all  - we’re inspiring others to do this work. The best message I ever got was, “You have to hear about my new project – it’s inspired by Connect the Dots!” We know that we didn’t invent connectionist work, but we’re thrilled to help facilitate it.      


IHE: What kind of influence do you hope CTD will have on people? What would success look like?

AM:
Success is in our name: Connect the Dots. We hope to influence people to connect the dots of human, animal, and environmental well-being.  Our theory of change is pretty simple: If people make connections between their well-being and the well-being of other animals and the environment, then they can incorporate concern for the planet and all of its inhabitants into their daily choices and the world can become a peaceful and just place. We know it’s bigger than this.  We know that measurable behavior change requires multiple, sometimes complex strategies. Yet by building a connectionist movement, we believe that we can change systems of violence and exploitation. For every connectionist that CtD creates, there is one more step towards comprehensive community health. A peaceful and just world for ALL.


IHE: What gives you hope for a just, compassionate, healthy world for all?

AM:
I am able to look back to 2005 and compare where we were to where we are now. The movement is still small, but it’s growing. In 2005, I didn’t think I’d ever find more than a handful of folks who made the connections. IHE didn’t have nearly as many graduates as it has today. The world really is changing. Those of us who do prevention work know that it’s often discouraging because we don’t have the quick, easily identifiable indicators of success that other more crisis or response-focused work does. I can’t tell you the number of positive behaviors that have resulted from my work. I can’t name the exploitive acts that I’ve prevented from occurring. But I can tell you that a movement is growing. I can name individuals who support connectionist work. I can point you to new connectionist resources that didn’t exist 7 years ago. It’s changing. We’re changing. That gives me hope.  

IHE: Future dreams/plans/projects?

AM:
We look forward to publishing our book, Connect the Dots Essays: How Human, Animal, and Environmental Well-Being are Connected! We also can’t wait to be able to give out mini-grants to support connectionist work and to host the first annual connectionist conference! We hope that you’ll all join us along the journey. 

~ Marsha

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iSweatshop? Listen to "Mr. Daisey and the Apple Factory"

Last weekend, I listened to Mike Daisey’s riveting monologue on the radio show This American Life about his trip to Shenzhen, China, to visit the factories where his electronics -- specifically his Apple products -- are made. I urge readers of this blog to listen to this episode, which includes not only Mike Daisey’s account, but the fact-checking efforts of the reporters at This American Life.

This was a profound example of humane education: providing information, fostering our curiosity and demanding our critical thinking, eliciting our reverence, respect, and sense of responsibility, and leaving us with a serious question: whether we’re willing to work to change systems so that our electronics are produced humanely and justly. Please listen.


 For a humane world,

Zoe Weil, President, Institute for Humane Education
Author of Most Good, Least Harm, Above All, Be Kind, and The Power and Promise of Humane Education
My TEDx talk: “The World Becomes What You Teach"

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You have read this article Apple products / China / consumerism / critical thinking / electronics / factories / human rights / humane education / iPhones / sweatshops / systemic change / This American Life with the title January 2012. You can bookmark this page URL http://actuosa-participatio.blogspot.com/2012/01/isweatshop-listen-to-daisey-and-apple.html. Thanks!