8 Great Sources for Free Films on Humane Issues

Especially these days when our youth begin drinking in technology about the same time they start breastfeeding, images and video are important tools in sharing information with kids and in encouraging them to think critically about important issues. But, it can be difficult to find good sources of video on humane issues that are quickly available and that have that all important element: they're free. Here are 8 great sources:

  1. Big Think - More than 600 short interviews with big thinkers on big ideas.
  2. Explore - Short films on a variety of topics, from animal and human rights to environmental protection to education and spirituality.
  3. Free Documentaries.org - More than 100 documentaries on a variety of social change issues.
  4. Global Oneness Project - Offers the stories, challenges & triumphs of changemakers & citizens around the world as a springboard for positive change.
  5. KarmaTube - It's not super-organized & the quality varies, but you can find some inspiring & informative video clips here.
  6. Media That Matters Film Festival - Short award-winning films on important topics. You can view each year's past winners.
  7. TED.com - Sample talks & performances from hundreds of thought leaders and changemakers.
  8. YouTube - Yes, it's the ubiquitous site that contains a whole lot of nonsense, but you can also search for videos on important global issues, from slavery to sustainability to sentience in animals.

And remember your local public library often has great videos to see and share. If you're an educator, you can often show such films for educational purposes under the fair use portion of copyright law (especially if you only show clips), but if you're an individual or part of a group, you need public performance rights (which often cost money). Still, you can always invite a few friends over for a great night of movies and discussion.

What great sites do you know about that offer free videos/clips on humane issues?

~ Marsha

Image courtesy of ssh via Creative Commons.



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Nice Versus Kind

What’s the difference between niceness and kindness?

To me, niceness is pleasant but a bit anemic, lacking depth and character. It’s not something to strive for or cultivate in any powerful way, unlike kindness, which is worthy of our full attention and the dedication of our lives.

Being kind is a daily practice, not a static quality like niceness can be. While the nice person may avoid a conflict and not tell a hard truth, someone who is kind will search for the right words to share what may not be pleasant, but which may be helpful and loving.

I recently finished the novel, Olive Kittredge (which I highly recommend). Olive is definitely not nice. But sometimes she is profoundly kind. In one chapter, Olive meets a young anorexic woman, and her eyes brim with tears as she speaks truth to this young woman and ensures her care by calling her mother and helping her get treatment. Others had simply been nice to her.

Kindness differs from niceness in another way as well. Niceness is generally perceived as a proximal quality. We are nice to others with whom we come in contact. Kindness is both proximal and expansive. To be truly kind, we must make choices in our lives that do the most good and least harm to all those our decisions affect, no matter how scattered across the globe. This includes making decisions about our work, activism, and participation in democracy -- as well as our lifestyle and dietary choices -- with the good of all in mind. In an interconnected world, making such decisions requires daily attention. Being kind not only means helping a friend in need, but also supporting a stranger across the ocean whose life may be affected by your product choices, and bringing our talents to bear on solving systemic problems that perpetuate harm and destruction. Nice people don’t necessarily take all these factors into consideration. Kind people do.

Nice people are common, which is... nice. Truly kind people are relatively rare, largely because it takes such commitment, knowledge, and skill to be deeply, consistently kind. Kindness is hard work, but I’ve come to believe it’s the most important work of all. Will our children be successful? Do well at school? Will we get that coveted position and raise? Will we be able to take that desired vacation? We want these things so much, and we strive for them. Would that we would strive so diligently for kindness! Would that every parent would want their children to be kind above all else. Instead of telling our children to be nice, we need to give them the knowledge, tools, and motivation to be genuinely, persistently kind.

~ Zoe Weil
Author of Most Good, Least Harm, Above All, Be Kind, and Claude and Medea

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Tribe of Heart's Online Screening Room Is Knocking Down Barriers to Positive Change

The Witness is a meaningful, moving documentary about the power of compassion and how deeply an awakening in one man's life changes his world. It has been winning awards and touching the lives of audiences for almost a decade, but so far it has only been viewable by DVD. The producers of The Witness have recognized that, if we want significant positive global change, then we need to remove barriers to that change. Tribe of Heart has developed an Online Screening Room, with the intention of (eventually) making their powerful films available free online to people around the world, thus removing barriers of "language, cost, convenience, and access." The Witness is already available to view free online in English and Spanish, and it will soon be available in 10 other languages.

Additionally, TOH has made it easier for people to set up free home screenings and to spread the word about the film, by providing a platform for people to send invitations to friends and family, by making it possible to share a link to the screening room via social media, and by creating a widget for people to post on their social media and web pages.

TOH gets points on two counts: They're making their films as accessible as possible. And, the film The Witness itself is incredibly powerful and life-changing (You can view a preview below - see the whole 43 minute documentary here. Note that there are some graphic scenes of animal cruelty, so the film isn't appropriate for all ages).





Be sure to see the film, and then take advantage of the Online Screening Room and share it with friends, family and others.

~ Marsha

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Humane Issues in the News...

Each week we post links to news about humane education & humane living, and items connected to humane issues, from human rights to environmental preservation, to animal protection, to media, consumerism and culture.


Students raise money to help change the world (via Miami Herald) (12/26/09)

"What my daughter taught me about compassion" (via Wall Street Journal) (12/25/09)

Climate change major challenge for survival of species (via Grist) (12/23/09)

"12 one-year personal stunts" on Treehugger's radar (via Treehugger) (12/23/09)

"California study finds new homes are toxic" (via TreeHugger) (12/22/09)

7 unlikely things global warming could take away (via Mother Nature Network) (12/09)


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Tribute to Sophie

In January 1998 a young German Shepherd was brought by the police into the clinic where my husband works as a veterinarian. She was a stray with severe nerve damage in her right rear leg, likely the result of having been hit by a car. After two weeks, during which no one claimed her, she needed a home – ours. When our then five-year-old son saw her, he was initially a little frightened by her. She was big, ungainly on her injured leg and a wee bit ferocious-looking. But Sophie, as we named her, was anything but ferocious. She was a gentle girl.

Although not in the least high-strung, Sophie ran around our meadow with glee, dragging her nerve-damaged leg behind her even as she barreled into people, oblivious when she was on a tear. After a year, my husband had to amputate her leg. He’d tried to save it, but despite booties and regular care, her toes kept getting abscesses. She couldn’t feel her foot. Sophie seemed depressed for a few days after her surgery, but she never complained. She learned to move gracefully on three legs and soon chased kids around the pond, never letting her disability stand in the way of a good game of tag.

Although Sophie’s manner was generally calm and elegant, her exuberance snuck out in funny ways. When she lost her hearing later in life, that didn’t stop her from “whoa, whoa, whoaing” loudly for food at 5:55 p.m. each night. She never vocalized for petting, though, just sat quietly as she was petted, and pawed your arm if you dared to stop.

Her best friend in the household for many years was our other three-legged dog, Griffin, also a rescue who’d been hit by a car and then abandoned. Griffin really was ferocious (he’s calmed down in his dotage), and the two of them were quite a pair: Griffin, weighing under ten pounds and ready to bark your head off (as well as bite it), trying to dominate the gracious, dignified Sophie. Sophie always indulged him.

Until she became too old, Sophie joined us on all our hikes. There were many times she couldn’t maneuver a steep rocky area, so she’d wait patiently in position for one of us to lift her rear leg up and help her. Then off she’d run.

She loved to swim. She joined me when I would swim laps around our pond and would overtake me as I’d swim in the ocean out to an island that appears at low tide. She'd get to the island, shake herself off, and lie down to wait for me. In her old age, she’d often go down to the pond alone to go for swim, then come back and climb on the couch, sopping wet, to take a nap. She loved sitting quietly in the grass in summer and on a snow bank in winter, with her head up, surveying the world around her. She also loved my garden, a bone of no small contention between us. For the last couple of summers, she ate the lion’s share of our asparagus, always managing to get the spears just as they were tall and ready to pick.

Sophie was quite compliant but she had a sneaky side. She seemed to accept that she wasn’t allowed on the bed (she was a very smelly dog); that is, until we left the house, and she’d sometimes climb up and queenly lay her head on the pillow. When we’d catch her sleeping there, she was quick to climb off the bed, seemingly contrite.

Sophie died a week ago on the winter solstice. She was in the end stages of bladder cancer, and we euthanized her the day that we could tell that all that was left was suffering. She still had not complained, even during her last twenty-four hours in which she couldn’t rest. She was close to thirteen years old.

Sophie modeled so many wonderful qualities. She was kind and friendly, knew how to share, never held a grudge, and was happy to play or to rest as the case might be.

I wish I had half the good qualities Sophie modeled every day. I’m trying to cultivate them.

I miss you Sophie. Thank you for everything.

~ Zoe Weil
Author of Most Good, Least Harm and Above All, Be Kind

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Bring Light

As I get older, I find myself full of mixed emotions around the holidays. There is such an expectation to be happy and fulfilled at this time of year, and yet we all know that plenty of people cannot participate in the hyped up gift-giving and celebration, especially during a recession, and this makes for disappointment, frustration, fear, and sadness, even if they may intellectually reject that very hype. This is part of the reason why I offered MOGO gift-giving tips earlier this month.

There are people laid off before the holidays, or who have just received a cancer diagnosis. And others whose marriages may have ended, or who have lost a loved one. The holidays are a stark reminder of what is gone. There are those without any place to go on the holidays, and those without homes at all.

This week is the darkest of the year in the northern hemisphere. It is not surprising that during this darkest time our society makes every effort to encourage celebration, generosity, and community. These stave off the dark emotions that can accompany the physical darkness. Singing, gathering, and candlelight bring us together and warm our spirits as well as our bodies. And at the very moment we celebrate in the darkness, the days are already getting longer, bringing light and hope even as we enter the coldest season.

So for those of us fortunate enough to be surrounded by love and who are safe, housed, well fed, and well clothed, my hope is that each of us will find a way to give of ourselves and ease some suffering, bring some joy, and kindle some light for those who may be struggling this holiday season.

Remember, as Philo of Alexandra said, “Be kind for everyone is fighting a great battle.”

Bring light,

Zoe Weil
Author of Most Good, Least Harm, Above All, Be Kind, and The Power and Promise of Humane Education

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Find Connection & Inspiration with the Global Oneness Project

A lot of people are focused inward during this holiday season, reflecting on family, community, spirituality, the meaning of life, new beginnings, hope for the future. A great resource for gaining hope, connectedness and inspiration for a better world and a meaningful life is The Global Oneness Project. The Global Oneness Project offers the stories, challenges and triumphs of changemakers and citizens around the world as a springboard for us to connect with others and to find our own ways of creating positive solutions to life's challenges. The Project has traveled the world, interviewing solutionaries (more than 280 so far) and creating short films (more than 25 so far) to engage us, inspire us and help us feel how deeply we're connected. From scientists to scholars to spiritual leaders and activists, the interviews highlight our shared needs and goals, and our ability to create the world we want. The films address issues and challenges that touch us all. All the films and interviews are available to view free online, and people who are willing to host a screening in their own community (gathering together at least 10 people) can receive a free DVD of many of the short films.

The website also offers a "Dialogues" section, which uses some of the films as a catalyst for discussing important questions.

The Global Oneness Project is a valuable resource for those of us seeking inspiration, wanting a deeper understanding of our world, or who are just needing a boost to the soul and spirit.

~ Marsha


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Create a Better World & a Meaningful Life With Our MOGO Online Course

Get in touch with your deepest values and learn to help transform the world -- use the exploration of inquiry, introspection and integrity to gain inner and outer peace: register now for our 30-day MOGO Online course!

There's still time to register for our January course (which begins January 2), but hurry, spaces are limited! The cost for individuals is only $89. (We have a special family rate of $89 for the first person and $25 for each additional family member.)

MOGO Online will educate and inspire you to do more good for yourself, other people, animals, and the environment.

Learn about the 7 Keys to MOGO and how to apply them to your own life.

As part of MOGO Online you'll have a chance to interact virtually with other participants through discussion boards, receive input from the course advisors (Marsha and Zoe) and connect with people who are passionate about empowering themselves and transforming the world. Participants will receive a copy of Most Good, Least Harm: A Simple Principle for a Better World and Meaningful Life by IHE President, Zoe Weil.


Download a couple sample exercises. (pdf)


“I found MOGO Online to be a life-altering experience on any number of levels. The simplest way I can think to express what I mean is that I emerged from MOGO Online feeling more conscious, more alive, more honest (with myself and others), more confident and more empowered.”
~ Stanley Weil

“This class was a truly inspiring experience. I think the exercises were thoughtfully designed to encourage deep introspection and were extremely valuable to me in my personal life.”

~ Tara Hodges

“It was one of the most rewarding "classroom" experiences I have had to date. The warmth, enthusiasm and insight that the other students and that our advisors shared made this more than just a learning experience -- it was a life experience. I feel privileged to have been part of this community.”
~ Anna Watkins

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Humane Issues in the News...

Each week we post links to news about humane education & humane living, and items connected to humane issues, from human rights to environmental preservation, to animal protection, to media, consumerism and culture.


AP launches maps of climate change data, including emissions, pledges & warming indicators (via Treehugger) (12/21/09)

"Unchopping a tree" - must-see video from Maya Lin (via Daily Green) (12/16/09)

Report ranks states for animal abuse laws (via Treehugger) (12/16/09)

Schools teaching students decision-making science (via Edutopia) (12/09)

Zogby polls shows only 44% of Americans want U.S. to act to reduce energy use if it involves major lifestyle changes - among the least wealthy, that number jumps to 62% (via Zogby) (12/15/09)

"Can China turn cotton green?" - research shows "dirty" side of "natural" cotton production (via Miller-McCune) (12/14/09)

Keep up with more humane issues in the news via our Facebook or Twitter pages.

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Our Top 10 Most Popular Humane Education Activities for 2009

Humane education activities and lesson plans are just one of the perks we provide in our Resource Center. We now have more than 75 humane education activities available for free download, and we add new ones often. Here are our 10 most downloaded activities as of the end of 2009:

  1. The World's Most Powerful Animal - Who’s the most dangerous AND the most powerful animal? We are! Lead students on an exploration of the positive and negative impacts our choices have on the planet. (grades 2-5)
  2. Judge Not, Lest Ye Be Judged - How do our own stereotypes and judgments limit our openness and receptivity to others? This activity uses props (or photos) to explore our snap perceptions of others. (grades 4 & up)
  3. Don't Tread on Me - What is oppression? Who gets oppressed? Why don’t we all agree about that? Participants explore their own beliefs about oppression and learn about others'. (grades 6 & up)
  4. Analyzing Advertising - Students learn to be ad-savvy by exploring the pervasiveness of ads in their lives and by analyzing what ads are trying to sell…and trying to hide. (grades 5 & up)
  5. Whale's Stomach - Students learn about the impact of our "throwaway" society by exploring all the different kinds of trash found in a whale's stomach. (grades 4 & up)
  6. Two Apples - In this icebreaker, participants learn just how important words and actions are when they explore their impact on two apples. (All ages)
  7. A Moment in Their Shoes - How will students feel spending a moment in the shoes of a battery hen or a child slave? Use this lively and thought- provoking activity to introduce human and animal issues and the connections between them. (grades 6 & up)
  8. Word Power - Words have enormous power and often assign value. This activity explores sample words in context and what kinds of value those words imply. (grades 4 & up)
  9. Lottery Ticket - Use this quick icebreaker to show participants that everyone can make a positive difference! (All ages)
  10. Whom Do You Pet & Whom Do You Eat? - What are our relationships with different kinds of animals, and why do those relationships exist? Lead students in an activity which explores why we treat different types of animals differently, and how we can learn to view them with different eyes. (grades 4 & up)


Image courtesy of tracitodd via Creative Commons.


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Bringing the MOGO Principle to the Holidays: Key 7: Striving for Balance

Usually, the holidays are anything but balanced. We often don’t eat balanced meals; we may tip the balance toward excess activity and away from relaxation, and we usually unbalance our checkbooks.

This holiday season, strive for balance. One of the challenges of MOGO living comes when we want to change our lives to reflect our values more deeply, but our culture makes it difficult to do this. We don’t like being different. We don’t like the inconvenience. We may not appreciate the call toward awareness, analysis, and responsibility. Our desires and values may come into conflict.

You may have felt some conflict reading these blog posts: the conflict between wanting to put lots of gifts under the tree for your expectant children, and wanting a simpler, more values-based holiday; between wanting more like-minded community-building, but also to be with your family of origin, even if they don’t share your goals; between wanting more stuff yourself and knowing that your desires may have unintended consequences on the environment.

Striving for a MOGO balance during the holiday season can come when we elevate some important values that often get overlooked when we write our list of best qualities. While some of our top ten values may include generosity, integrity, compassion, honesty, kindness, and courage, there are other wonderful values that may be just what we need to cultivate and embrace during the holiday challenges. These include:

  • flexibility
  • humor
  • creativity
  • humility
  • patience
  • acceptance
  • openness

With these values in mind, we can be kind to ourselves, accept our limitations, aim to use the 6 keys to MOGO while acknowledging that this 7th is a critical component of a joyful MOGO life, too.

Happy holidays everyone,

Zoe Weil
Author of Most Good, Least Harm, Above All, Be Kind, and The Power and Promise of Humane Education

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Repost from 12/24/08.

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Making Data Meaningful: Two Helpful Resources

Percentages, statistics, data. I can read that broccoli travels an average of 1,800 miles from farm to table, or I can get a general sense that, say, the things we're most likely to die from are not those most often reported, or those the public most fixates on. But, as I'm a visual and kinesthetic learner, numbers and vague patterns are much more meaningful when put into a graphic context. I always learn better when I can see it and do it.

Two useful resources that I love for helping me better understand global issues and concepts are Good's Infographics and the visual guides at Information is Beautiful. Both sites use charts, graphs, maps and other other visual representations to convey data about (usually) important global issues. Some of the recent examples from Good include "How Far Your Produce Travels," "Which Countries Eat the Most Meat," the countries that have reduced their number of HIV positive populations least and most, and all the missions NASA has sent past Earth orbit. Recent tasty tidbits from Information is Beautiful -- which is British-based -- range from the eco-footprint of dogs to the number of deaths by certain drugs versus which drugs are most frequently reported on.

Of course, as with all data, the information from these sources can't be taken for granted. Both sites are pretty good at providing at least general sources, but these visual representations also provide an excellent opportunity for me to engage my critical thinking and accurate information-seeking skills.

They're great tools for humane educators and concerned citizens.

~ Marsha

Image courtesy of mkandlez via Creative Commons license.

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Bringing the MOGO Principle to the Holidays: Key 6: Find & Create Community

It’s particularly challenging during the holiday season to buck the buy-as-much-as possible system without support. Your family may not be happy without dozens of gifts under the Christmas tree or expensive presents each day of Hanukkah. It’s important to find or create a community of people who also want a holiday season that revolves around joyful giving, sharing, and connection, not just the buying of more stuff.

Start with your family. Have a discussion about what would bring the most joy this holiday season. Share ideas about gifts of service and donations, about starting new traditions that include volunteering or treasure hunts or game-playing. Delve deep to discover what would bring the greatest gifts to your family members. Expand your concept of family to include new friends who share your values. Find a way to celebrate with these friends through a potluck gathering, music-making, conversation, charades. Bring interpersonal interactions back into your life (as opposed to virtual interactions on your computer!) to build a stronger, more connected community.

~ Zoe Weil
Author of Most Good, Least Harm, Above All, Be Kind, and The Power and Promise of Humane Education

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Reposted from 12/22/08.

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CDC Releases New Report About the Environmental Chemical Cocktail in Your Body

Perchlorate. Volatile organic compounds. Arsenic. Bisphenol A. Atrazine. Fire retardants. Pesticides. Insecticides. Heavy metals. It sounds like the list of chemicals it is, but what you probably didn't expect is that chances are good that you have one or more of these bouncing around in your body.

The CDC has just released its 2009 National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals, which tests the blood and/or urine of U.S. volunteers to determine levels and types of exposure to environmental chemicals, defined as "[a] chemical compound or chemical element present in air, water, food, soil, dust, or other environmental media, such as consumer products." The report reveals 212 environmental chemical contaminants in thousands of volunteers, tested from 1999-2004; 75 of those chemicals have been measured in for the first time.

Some of the chemicals that were found in the vast majority of volunteers include fire retardants, Bisphenol A, and one of the chemicals used to create non-stick coatings in cookware. Not all the news is disheartening, though, as the report also showed that levels in children, ages 1-5, have decreased.

Find out more.

(Thanks to the Environmental Working Group for the heads up about this report. EWG does their own toxicity testing, research & reporting.)

~ Marsha

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Humane Parenting Toolbox: Preventing & Responding to Prejudice

Studies have shown that young children (as early as age 2) demonstrate awareness of racial and other differences at a very young age. Kids also are incredibly curious, look for behaviors to mimic, and can easily develop biases and form judgments minus any critical thought. Many parents want to help their children grow into people who are inclusive, accepting and kind to everyone but often don't know where to start or how deeply to explore the issues with their kids.

Teaching Tolerance has created a useful tool to guide parents who want to raise humane children: Beyond the Golden Rule: A Parent's Guide to Preventing and Responding to Prejudice (pdf). The guidebook is divided into four primary sections: ages 2-5, ages 6-12, ages 13-17, and reflecting upon our own biases. In addition to general, age-appropriate information each section includes an "expert Q&A" as well as "5 tips" specific to each age group. The last section helps parents reflect up their own biases and how those might influence their parenting.

~ Marsha

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Bringing the MOGO Principle to the Holidays: Key 3: Make Connections & Self-Reflect

As you buy gifts, food, wrapping paper, ornaments, etc., this holiday season ask yourself some questions. What are the effects of these purchase on other people, animals, and the environment? All your purchases will contribute to the economy, which is a positive effect in these hard times, but your money is your vote for the world you want. Some purchases have very negative consequences. For example, a toy made from plastic in an overseas sweatshop may contribute to pollution, human exploitation, and resource depletion, whereas a wooden toy made locally from an artisan may be more aligned with your values. Facial lotion from a company which tests its products on animals may be less aligned with your values than a lotion made by a cottage industry with natural ingredients that are known to be safe.

As you ask questions about the products you’re considering buying, you will need to make some effort to find the answers. Very little is supplied by the labels and ingredients. You’ll have to dig to find out if your purchases are truly aligned with your values. You can visit Responsible Shopper to learn about some of the larger multinational companies and their products. You can also find a wealth of resources for such research through the weblinks at the Institute for Humane Education (and in my book, Most Good, Least Harm).

After doing some research to make connections between the things you buy and their effects, self-reflect. What choices matter to you? Having learned new information, what new choices can you make that are in accordance with your values?

~ Zoe


Reposted from 12/18/08.

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Listen to the Trees: Use Your Creativity to Find Positive Solutions

This last fall my husband, some friends and I took a trip to hike around the Oregon and California Redwoods. We spent four days gazing upward, mouths open, eyes wide, amazed and alight at the "majestic," "massive," "towering," "colossal," trees (the guidebooks worked hard to find lots of appropriate descriptors). One thing we noticed was how creative the trees were in finding ways to survive. In such dense growth, trees need to find their way to the sun, so we saw countless examples of trees twisting, turning and melding around and with one another to reach the light. Some trees grew together to form multiple trunks. Some wove their big branches in curvaceous forms around the trunks surrounding them. Some developed corkscrew trunks (like in the photo) or grew in all sorts of shapes and directions. Whatever the challenge, many of the trees found a creative way to fulfill their needs for space and sun.

This observation struck me as a great lesson for us humans to follow: using creativity to find positive solutions to our own challenges. The trees didn't limit themselves to either/or (either I grow straight up or I don't). They found creative ways to get their needs met, often in ways that didn't harm the other trees and flora around them.

Our news and our government policies -- and often our own minds -- are filled with either/or thinking. Jobs or environment. Economy or global warming. People or animals. Us or them. Capitalism or chaos. Industrial agriculture is the only way to feed people. Jail is the only way to deal with criminals. I have to keep the job I have or go broke. The only way to fulfill this need is by buying this gadget. We hear and read about it so much, that it seems the only way to react.

We all have the power to use our creativity to generate solutions to our and society's problems. So listen to the trees the next time you find yourself facing what seems like an either/or situation. Get creative. Bend, twist, turn, meld, grow. And reach for the light.

~ Marsha

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Image courtesy John Rakestraw.
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Humane Issues in the News...

Each week we post links to news about humane education & humane living, and items connected to humane issues, from human rights to environmental preservation, to animal protection, to media, consumerism and culture.

Coconut-carrying Octopus shows invertebrates use tools (via Huffington Post) (12/15/09)

Alaskan coastline eroding at 45 ft/yr (via Treehugger) (12/15/09

Philly diners practice paying it forward, buying others' meals (via Ethics Newsline) (12/14/09)

NY couple lives in 175 sq. ft. (via Treehugger) (12/10/09)

How many bicyclists does it take to power a house? (via Treehugger) (12/7/09)

Sustainable food movement "neglects poor workers and eaters" (via San Francisco Bay Guardian) (12/2/09)

Keep up with more humane issues in the news via our Facebook or Twitter pages.

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"Dive!"ing into the Problem of Food Waste

At a time of massive food insecurity, more people are starting to pay attention to all the food that's being wasted. A recent study reports that Americans waste about 40% of their food. That's a lot of waste, especially when we consider how many people go hungry every day.

There are increased efforts to reduce food waste in schools and in communities, but some people are taking the matter into their own hands -- taking advantage of the waste to feed themselves, to feed others and to feed interest in changing the systems and habits that allow so much food to be tossed in dumpsters.

Jeremy Seifert has created the film Dive!, which looks at the practice of dumpster diving and exposes the culture of waste that our American society has generated. Against the backdrop of following around a group of dumpster divers in Los Angeles, Seifert asks lots of questions, such as why we generate such waste, why the extra food goes in the dumpster instead of to hungry people, why stores don't work harder to redirect their waste, and why people get arrested and hassled for trying to redirect other people's trash out of the waste stream.

Check out the trailer below, or see it at Dive!'s website.




~ Marsha

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Bringing the MOGO Principle to the Holidays: Key 2: Pursue Joy Through Service

Many are suffering this holiday season. Millions have lost their jobs and are struggling with the basics. They cannot even buy their children a winter coat or mittens, let alone a new toy. During this holiday season, consider how you might be of service to those in your community who are facing serious hardship, and make a commitment to give. You might give in the form of volunteering for a local non-profit, helping out at the local homeless shelter, bringing baked treats to people in a nursing home or hospital, shoveling an elderly neighbor’s drive when it snows. You might also want to connect with churches and synagogues that organize gift-giving to people who cannot afford presents for their kids.

When you take such action, you will likely discover an incredible side effect: joy. Perhaps more than anything else, giving to others brings us deep joy. At least that is what dozens of people I interviewed for Most Good, Least Harm told me. How nice that what is best for others is often best for us, too.

~ Zoe

Image courtesy of IndyDina and Mr. Wonderful.
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Repost from 12/16/08.
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Gift-Giving of a Different Kind: 29 Gifts

With the planning, shopping, spending, and stressing that tend to hover over the holidays, there isn't always a lot of focus on generosity or gratitude. Since you're likely in a gifting sort of mindset anyway, considering shifting your search for the perfect present for someone who doesn't really need more stuff, to giving gifts of a different sort. Cami Walker has written a book and created a website called 29 Gifts. Shortly after her wedding, Cami discovered that she had MS, and in the midst of pain and distress and depression, a friend and spiritual advisor suggested she stop giving so much energy to her disease and focus on giving energy to generosity and gratitude by giving 29 gifts in 29 days -- gifts that weren't planned, that cost little or no money, that benefited others in some way. She did, and it changed her life. Now she's campaigning for others to try the 29 gifts challenge.

It's easy. Just pay attention each day, looking for opportunities to give to others. Whether it's a kind word, some spare change, or a few minutes of your time, there is plenty you can do to cultivate a spirit of compassion and generosity, which helps both you and the world. What a great gift.

~ Marsha

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MOGO Gift-Giving #4

Consider writing heartfelt letters to those on your list of gift recipients to share what you love and appreciate about them. Before you abandon this idea too quickly as too mushy or overly intimate, remember that such letters can recount stories about the person that made you laugh, gave you solace, helped you learn something. Being seen and appreciated is an extraordinary gift, and taking the time to share memories and gratitude is great for both you and the receiver.

~Zoe Weil
Author of Most Good, Least Harm, Above All, Be Kind, and Claude and Medea

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Humane Education in Action: Bringing Kindness to Belize

Colette Case has spent her whole life teaching and working with people about the human-animal connection and serving as an educator and expert to others. When she moved to Belize, she decided that humane education was the best way to use her experience and expertise to help create a kinder world.

Quick Facts:


Current hometown: San Pedro, Ambergris Caye, Belize, Central America
IHE fan since: 2008
Current job: I work with my partner running a photography business.
Your hero: I have so many and they change all the time. Sometimes it is the single mother I know who works every day to ensure that her child has an education. Sometimes it is people like Dr. Paul Farmer. Sometimes it is people like Peter Tatchell. Sometimes it is my partner for making me soup when I’m sick.
Guilty pleasure: Red wine.
Inspired by: Smart, strong and sassy women.
Love about yourself: My uniqueness.
One of your strengths: Critical thinking.
Desired epitaph or tagline: "She was most definitely here."


IHE: What led you to the path of humane education?

CC: I came from an abusive home and ran away as a teenager. I ended up homeless with my dogs and learned a great deal about how much pets can mean to people through that experience. I ended up going back to school, getting through university and specialising in the field of human/animal relationships –- giving my first presentation at the International Society for Human Animal Interactions in Montreal in 1992. I set up a programme called the Hope Project, which provided veterinary care for pets belonging to homeless people.

This led me to the foundation of PATHWAY, a national multidisciplinary panel in the UK looking at the issues of pets in public housing and the development and publication of Guidelines for Housing Providers on Pets in Housing, which was endorsed by the Department of the Environment. This project was very important to me, because the biggest barrier I had experienced when trying to escape from homelessness had been my refusal to give up my dogs. I learned that there were so many people who were not able to find a home because pets were banned from most rental accommodations. I also discovered that people who acquired pets were being evicted and made homeless by social housing providers who had ‘no pets allowed’ rules for their properties. Many of these people were vulnerable, disabled or elderly and were finding themselves in the awful situation of having to choose between disposing of a much loved companion animal or becoming homeless. Another issue was that women who were trying to escape domestic violence were being told that they had to leave their pets behind, as there was not a single hostel or safe house for women that was pet-friendly. Many women chose to remain with their abusers because they knew that their animals would suffer greatly if they left them behind.

By 1992, the Hope Project had grown too large for me to run on my own; it was assimilated by The Dogs’ Trust, the UK’s largest dog charity, and I was employed to co-ordinate the project and develop the charity’s behaviour department, as well as to train and educate staff. I also served as advisor to the All Party Parliamentary Group on Animal Welfare and was the Dogs’ Trust’s specialist in canine legislation, fighting dogs, and canine aggression, as well as their media spokesperson on these issues

As a youth leader for a London borough, I worked closely with children from the homeless community and ran an annual summer play scheme. I also worked as a dog trainer, animal behaviourist and animal welfare consultant, serving seven veterinary practices in London.

I have also been lucky enough to have the opportunity to teach internationally in more than seven countries on subjects including the human/animal relationship, animal behaviour and welfare and animal welfare legislation. My students have included veterinary surgeons, counsellors, law students, professional animal trainers and those in animal law enforcement. As a result, I’ve been featured in numerous media, with my last high profile job in the UK co-presenting “Test Your Pet,” for the BBC, an educational family programme about animal intelligence. I have also worked as an expert and consultant to animal welfare organisations, the police, the courts, the legal profession, the arts and the media both in the UK and abroad, working on cases ranging from dangerous dog attacks to child sexual abuse involving animals.

So, as you can see, my whole adult life has been devoted to working with humans and animals, learning and teaching about their relationships. When I moved to Belize, it seemed like a natural progression to contribute to the community by using my knowledge and skills. I knew I didn’t want to work in the field of dog training or behavior, and I didn’t want to become involved in the politics of joining groups or sitting on committees, so I looked around to see what was needed and it was clear that humane education would be something I could really get involved in.


IHE: Tell us about your Be Kind Belize program.

Be Kind Belize logoCC: I set up the Be Kind Belize programme in 2007 in my community on a small Caye (island) off the coast of Belize called Ambergris Caye. Having done some volunteer work with the local humane society, and feeling that I wanted to make a contribution using my experience and skills in the most constructive way, I decided to work on prevention through education. So, I contacted some of the wonderful people around the world whom I had worked with and met throughout my career and asked them for their advice and guidance. I developed a basic curriculum based on my research and approached schools. Two schools were particularly receptive, and I started teaching their students during the last academic year. I also set up educational talks in the community and worked with the local press to further disseminate information. We worked together on a number of issues, including the illegal feeding of crocodiles and the poisoning of stray dogs as a means of population control. I also wrote a neuter/spay leaflet for the humane society to assist them with their important work.

After working with the schools for a year I learned that much of the subject matter and material I used, despite every effort I had made, was still not necessarily relevant to children I was teaching. I was still going through a cultural shift myself, getting to know the people and the country where I had chosen to make my home. So, I took what I learned, went away and revised my curriculum.

The feedback from the children and the schools are my measure of success. I have had one teacher tell me that she has changed the way she teaches and has introduced the positive reinforcement methods I use the in programme to motivate her kids. Teachers have reported that they have seen a reduction in bullying after the children have participated in the programme. The kids just seem to love Be Kind Belize and stop me in the street or bring their parents to introduce them to me when they see me out and about. I think that the single biggest success is that the schools invite me back and have asked me to expand the programme this year to include other age groups.


IHE: You recently revamped your curriculum. Tell us about that.

CC: The curriculum is eight lessons long and is designed to be taught in full. It employs behaviour modification techniques to reward children for being kind and for recognising kindness in others. The lessons include:

1. Kind Kids, which explores the concept of kindness.
2. Feeling and Learning, which helps children understand and appreciate empathy for others.
3. Wild Animals, which teaches children the importance of wildlife in their lives, which is particularly relevant in Belize, as it is entirely dependent on tourism and is considered an “eco destination.”
4. Keep it Wild, which looks at the differences between wild and domestic animals and why wild animals do not make good pets.
5. Animal Populations, which investigates human, pet and wild animal populations.
6. Responsibility, which looks at the meaning of responsibility and ways that the children can manifest that in their lives.
7. Dog Bite Prevention, which I believe is so important when trying to deal with human/animal conflict.
8. Animal Puppets, when the children get an opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned by performing their own skits using puppets they have created.

The children all get graduation certificates and one child, who has been chosen by their peers as the “Kindest Kid,” receives a prize. There are also other prizes given when the kids cash in their Be Kind Belize Reward Coins, which they will have earned by doing homework, participation and for recognising kindness in others.

Be Kind Belize was designed to complement the Belize National Curriculum, which has made it much easier for schools to justify introducing the programme.


IHE: What are the challenges you’ve found are specific to teaching kids and families and in dealing with humane issues in Belize?

Colette with kids from the Be Kind Belize programCC: There have been many challenges. Firstly, I am foreign. I am not from Belize, I did not grow up here, and so I am learning about the Belizean culture from scratch. While English is the national language, many children speak Spanish primarily, so there have been a few challenges in terms of language. Animal welfare as a concept is fairly unknown by most people. Many Belizeans are extremely poor and struggle to have their basic needs met. The island that I live on is relatively prosperous compared to other parts of Belize, where even basic necessities such as access to fresh water or electricity are not realities for many people. Belize is a very mixed culture. Ambergris Caye is primarily Mestizo, but we have a large (Belizean) Creole population, who generally are the majority in other parts of Belize, a Garifuna community, as well as many immigrants from other countries in Central America. There are also small populations of Chinese and Arab people, as well as North American and European immigrants living here too. On the mainland, the population is even more diverse, with Maya people and Mennonites both being significant members of the community. This gives you some idea of how truly diverse the culture is here and without having some understanding of each individual culture, it is impossible to participate effectively.

In addition to this, as a white “gringa” foreigner, I have had to work hard to gain some acceptance. There is some resentment of white foreigners, as Belize was a former British Colony and only gained its Independence some 26 years ago. White foreigners have been known to exploit Belize and its land, even now, with developers buying up all the good property and building housing that no Belizean can afford. Combine this with the belief that white foreigners care for animals more than they do for people, which is a common belief because of all the fundraising that is done by the humane society -- almost exclusively by expats. Also, conservation work has appeared to many in Belize to have made hunting and fishing more difficult. So, the whole concept of doing anything related to “being kind to animals” quickly raises hackles. Many of the children here live in shacks; they don’t have a bed, they don’t have regular meals –- so why on earth should they be concerned about animals? That does tend to be a common attitude. The lives of animals are cheap here. They are readily available and easily replaced. Abusing them for sport is cheap entertainment for some. Also, all that is required to become a teacher in Belize is a high school education, so I am often working with teachers who are facing their own challenges in terms of developing their skills.

So, I have had to develop my approach with great cultural sensitivity and respect for the way people feel about animals in Belize.


IHE: What kind of community involvement and support are you receiving?

CC: Because I have been respectful in my approach and taken on board all suggestions and criticisms, I’ve received tremendous support. Both local newspapers support Be Kind Belize and regularly publicise our activities. I was recently invited to present a paper at the first national conference held by the Belize Wildlife Conservation Network, and as a result of the conference, I have been working closely with members of the wildlife community and hope to work with a newly forming wildlife institute in Belize to help them develop their educational programme. I have been invited to speak to counseling students at Belize University and have also been asked to appear on the national breakfast television programme. I have become an independent consultant to the Forest Department on the development of new wildlife legislation and was thrilled that when I took a group of children to the mainland for a “Kind Kids Adventure” last summer individuals and businesses ensured that nine children had a fantastic and very educational two-day trip.


IHE: Any future plans, dreams or projects?

CC: I’d like to hold a training seminar for teachers, because the teachers that I have met have been so keen to learn about new things and just don’t have the time or access to the information. We’ll see how that goes. I don’t want to be in charge of an organisation, so I have developed Be Kind Belize so that anyone in Belize can take the curriculum, supported by an Educators’ Resource Pack, adopt a school and start their own programme locally. I suppose my dream is to see it take on a life of its own and become a national programme run by volunteers and available to every school in the country.


IHE: Anything you’d like to add?

CC: I came from a rather unconventional background, having been homeless for many years from the age of 16, when I left my home in the USA and went to London, England. Having that perspective has helped me to understand how important it is not to judge, prejudge or make assumptions. It was the kindness, compassion, encouragement, support and unconditional love shown to me by so many in my life that enabled me to finish my education, get a home, a career and ultimately to live my dream by living on a tropical island in the Caribbean. Through my life, I’ve tried to be honest with myself about my own personal limitations and accept that each individual can only do what they can do realistically. As an individual with the capacity to understand my own impact on the planet and a level of consciousness enabling me to empathise with other living creatures, I am incredibly lucky. I know and accept that not everyone feels this way and I suppose that is one of the parts of diversity that makes us dynamic as a species. I also know that there are others with an even stronger sense of empathy and compassion in their way of life. For some reason, I have a conscience that rests easier when I know that I’ve done my best –- and so I shall continue to do so. I respect and admire all others who are involved in humane education at whatever level and hope that they continue to feel inspired, motivated and energised by helping to make the world a better place.


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Shop Smarter with The Blue Pages Directory

If you'd like a tool to help you know more about which businesses have better labor and human rights practices or which political parties they contribute to, so that you can make choices more closely aligned with your values, pick up a copy of The Blue Pages, a directory that rates companies based on their political and social practices. The directory is organized into 13 different sectors (from clothing, shoes and accessories to media and entertainment to restaurants to telecommunications and internet), and companies are listed alphabetically within them. Each sector offers an overview, and each company's listing includes any campaign contributions and/or lobby spending, as well as brief information about any positive or negative human rights, labor, social justice or community activities.

Using resources such as The Blue Pages [as well as other sources such as Responsible Shopper, Better World Shopper, Free2Work (brand new & still in beta) and the Good Guide] gives concerned citizens more power to make choices that support humane values.

~ Marsha

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MOGO Gift-Giving #3

While this idea is one that not everyone appreciates, you may find that there are those among your list of gift recipients who would be very grateful for the following: A gift in their name supporting one of their favorite charities.

For the past thirteen years any time anyone asks me what I might like as a gift, I always say a donation to the Institute for Humane Education (IHE), the organization I co-founded in 1996. (I don’t take a salary at IHE, so I’m not asking people to fund me!) This is the best gift I can ever receive because it furthers my greatest dreams and hopes for a better world.

There are likely people in your life who care deeply about certain causes and who want to see change happen. By giving a gift in their name to a cause or organization they support you are honoring them in one of the deepest ways possible.

Such gifts may seem impersonal and don’t provide something to open and keep, but a card that shares why you gave to the charity you did in their name may be the most meaningful gift that person receives all season.

Stay tuned for more tips,

~ Zoe Weil
Author of Most Good, Least Harm, Above All, Be Kind, and Claude and Medea


Image courtesy of quaziephoto via Creative Commons.



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"The People Speak" Offers Unique Perspective on History

I still remember the day a parent came up to me at the Reference desk at a public library where I occasionally worked and asked me where she could find an older history textbook that had “just the real facts” and not any of this asking students about their feelings about what happened in history, or that politically correct stuff that her daughter’s school textbook had. While I tried to determine more specifically what her needs were (like a good librarian does), I also mentioned that, while dates and locations and names are often factual, all of history is in some way biased, as it is seen and written about through the lenses of different people with different values and perspectives.

Often the voices of history we hear are those with the power to make their voices heard. Historian Howard Zinn is famous (or infamous, depending on your perspective) for highlighting the voices and views of the "ordinary" and oppressed.

Now Zinn's work has sparked a special that will be shown on the History Channel on December 13. The People Speak uses the voices of soldiers and slaves, immigrants, women, young people and others -- through their letters, diaries and speeches -- to paint a different picture of history. Celebrity actors read these real-life excerpts while Zinn serves as narrator.

You can see video excerpts online now.

The People Speak serves as a counterpoint to traditional historical resources and offers students a chance to compare different perspectives and to think more critically about what ends up becoming "just the facts" of history and why.

~ Marsha

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Humane Issues in the News...

Each week we post links to news about humane education & humane living, and items connected to humane issues, from human rights to environmental preservation, to animal protection, to media, consumerism and culture.


"Seafood Slavery: Americans eat Thai shrimp caught by forced labor" (via Blue Living Ideas) (12/7/09)

I'd rather not know: the psychology of climate denial (via The Independent) (12/5/09)

"How Europe's Discarded Computers Are Poisoning Africa's Kids" (via Der Spiegel) (12/4/09)

Third side thinking helps conflict between villagers, gorillas in Uganda (via Worldchanging) (12/4/09)

Wrong Number Miracle (via NBC San Diego) - Good Samaritan helps out needy mom and daughter. (12/2/09)

Ugandan bill seeks to criminalize homosexuality; calls for death penalty for "serial offenders" (via Reuters) (12/2/09)

Europe grants animals legal status of "sentient" beings (via Vegan.com) (12/2/09)

Humans may be born with innate need to help (via NY Times) (12/1/09)

Keep up with more humane issues in the news via our Facebook or Twitter pages.

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MOGO Bookshelf: Family Activism

by Kelly Coyle DiNorcia, IHE M.Ed. graduate and humane parenting consultant

“Family” and “Activism” can often feel like they are mutually exclusive. Finding time in a busy family schedule to do volunteer work or even write a letter to an editor or representative can seem overwhelming. But Roberto Vargas, in his book Family Activism: Empowering Your Community, Beginning With Family and Friends (Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2008) reminds us that activism begins at home. Vargas defines Family Activism as “interacting with those close to you in a way that inspires and prepares them to serve their families and communities as a positive force for change. It is teaching and modeling love among all your relationships, extending acts of caring, thereby encouraging more folks to increase their commitment and time to advancing love and change." (10) In other words, family activists approach their most intimate relationships with the intention of being the change they want to see in the world.

I know that I am not the only person whose activism changed when I had a family. I no longer have the time or energy for the type of volunteer work I used to do, and I’ve had to discover new ways to fit activism into my life as a parent. I am also required to consider whether and how to include my children in my activism. Is it safe? Is it age-appropriate? Does it interest them?

According to Vargas, though, one need not march on Washington or perform an undercover farmed animal rescue to make a difference in the world. He argues that “All people who actively care for and serve others are activists." (21) Vargas has developed what he calls the Familia Approach, in which we express ourselves as activists by creating a culture of peace, consensus, and empowerment within our families. And from there, we simply view everyone as family and our impact spreads to our communities and beyond. We may never know the effects of our actions, but it is important that we approach all our interpersonal interactions with an attitude of porvida, or profound love of life and humanity.

Using examples from his own personal and professional life as a community organizer, Vargas gives readers strategies for leading successful family and community council meetings as well as empowering others to be effective communicators and agents of change. Using the concept of El Sí, or Yes Energy, he counsels readers to connect with their own power and purpose and help those around them to do the same by recognizing their connection with everyone around them.

Helping a sibling work through a difficult situation. Showing a new neighbor around town. Bringing a meal to an ill friend. Offering a word of encouragement to a stranger in the grocery store. All these things can seem so insignificant. The idea of “think globally, act locally” can seem clichéd and, frankly, intended for those who do not want to do the work required to address the Big Issues in a Big Way. Vargas, however, makes a compelling argument that acting locally is, indeed, the place all activists must start in order to truly bring peace and equality to our world.

Kelly DiNorcia is a graduate of IHE's Master of Education in Humane Education program, and serves as a humane parenting consultant, offering workshops and presentations on humane parenting issues. She has also published articles in several parenting-related magazines. Find out more about Kelly at her website, Beautiful Friendships, or follow her blog, Ahimsa Mama.

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MOGO Gift-Giving #2

Making gifts is really fun. Even if you think you’re the least creative person in the world, there are things you can make that will be better received than any store-bought item, in large part because you took the time to make it. Below is a list of gifts I’ve either made and/or received from others who’ve made them:

• Candleholders made from tree branches using pipe-fittings drilled into the wood to hold the candle
• Cards with photographs or artwork printed on them
• Cookies, pies, spiced pecans, jams, wine, vinegars, pickles, applesauce, cakes, chutneys, sauces
• Scented powders and bath salts
• Balsam pillows
• Bird feeders
• Birdhouses
• Art, sculptures
• Musical recordings
• Paste paper covering otherwise thrown out jars and boxes, turning them into beautiful containers
• Candles
• Crocheted or knitted hats, mittens, booties, blankets, or scarves
• Earrings, necklaces, bracelets, barrettes
• Wreaths
• Collages, scrapbooks, photo albums
• Decorated or painted clothes (from a thrift shop)
• A poem or song
• A coupon book of fun activities
• A treasure hunt for found treasures (shells, sea glass, beautiful rocks)

More tips to come,

Zoe Weil
Author of Most Good, Least Harm, Above All, Be Kind, and Claude and Medea

Image courtesy of elana's pantry via Creative Commons.

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Humane Education Activity: What Price Beauty?

Our obsession with looks and beauty -- especially among women -- is at an all-time high. We search endlessly for the products that will transform our bodies into a more acceptable and desirable form, from the softness of our skin and the smoothness of our legs to the bounciness of our hair and the length and thickness of our eyelashes. Marketers have us mesmerized. A recent news story from Britain reported that the average woman in the UK wears more than 500 chemicals a day. Most of us don't think about the external costs of these products, how they affect the health of our own bodies, other people, animals or the earth. What Price Beauty? invites students (grades 8 and up) to explore the impact of the ingredients in their favorite products on people, animals and the earth, to consider how marketing ties into their product choices, and to look for healthier alternatives.

Download What Price Beauty?

Image courtesy of OrangeCounty_Girl via Creative Commons.


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MOGO Gift-Giving #1

Gift-giving season is upon us. In my next few posts, I’m going to offer MOGO gift-giving tips. I’m hoping this sparks your creativity and turns this gift-giving season into a truly pleasurable experience!

My friend Patty loves when the Christmas tree has lots of presents under it, and I can totally relate. Somehow, a tree with just a few presents makes me sad, even though I reject the consumerist culture that surrounds us and pressures us into buying more unnecessary, unsustainable, inhumane, cruelly-produced stuff.

No matter how much I believe that less is more and that voluntary simplicity is wonderful, I love giving gifts, and when it’s time to fill my son’s and husband’s stockings, I feel horrified if the stocking is less than half full. But my husband really doesn’t want anything, and I know that he opens his gifts hoping that I haven’t bought more stuff. Despite my values, some inner child kicks in and demands that the holidays include the right amount of presents. What’s the MOGO answer?

Here’s my first idea, to be followed in the coming posts by more:

Think about who is on your list and ask yourself: “What does this person enjoy doing or want to learn?” Then consider giving a gift of your time to enable them to do what they love. For example, your son may like attending hockey games, so you can give him tickets for a game. Such gifts don’t have to cost money though. Would your best friend like a manicure? Offer to give one. Do you know how to make a craft and does your mother enjoy learning a new art? Provide a lesson. Does your partner enjoy back rubs? Make a coupon book for weekly massages. Does your neighbor admire your garden and want to learn how to grow vegetables? Offer to help him start one. Perhaps your spouse wants more time to pursue an interest. Could you offer to pick up a chore or two to enable her to have that time? Or maybe your partner wants to learn a new language or how to ballroom dance or practice Aikido. Sign both of you up for classes and learn together.

Stay tuned for more MOGO gift-giving tips.

~ Zoe Weil
Author of Most Good, Least Harm, Above All, Be Kind, and Claude and Medea

Image courtesy of wolfsavard via Creative Commons.

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New Video of Zoe Weil's Talk About the MOGO Principle

IHE President Zoe Weil gave a talk at the College of the Atlantic in Bar Harbor, Maine in July about the MOGO Principle. You can see the first segment here:



and then go to IHE's new YouTube page to view the rest of the segments (9 total).

If you enjoy Zoe's talk, please share the video with others.


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